More Boudicca!

I’ve just finished Rosemary Sutcliff’s Song for a Dark Queen. It was fantastic! It describes the life and last battle of Boudicca, Queen of the Iceni.

Blogger Anne posted a great comment to my last post, with a link to a fascinating article about the historical knowledge of Boudicca, written by Margaret Donsbach. Here’s the link to the full article - http://www.historynet.com/boudica-celtic-war-queen-who-challenged-rome.htm

And here is some of the article -

Boudica – Celtic War Queen Who Challenged Rome

She slaughtered a Roman army. She torched Londinium, leaving a charred layer almost half a meter thick that can still be traced under modern London. According to the Roman historian Cornelius Tacitus, her army killed as many as 70,000 civilians in Londinium, Verulamium and Camulodunum, rushing ‘to cut throats, hang, burn, and crucify. Who was she? Why was she so angry?

Most of Boudica’s life is shrouded in mystery. She was born around AD 25 to a royal family in Celtic Britain, and as a young woman she married Prasutagus, who later became king (a term adopted by the Celts, but as practiced by them, more of an elected chief) of the Iceni tribe. They had two daughters, probably born during the few years immediately after the Roman conquest in ad 43. She may have been Iceni herself, a cousin of Prasutagus, and she may have had druidic training. Even the color of her hair is mysterious. Another Roman historian, Cassius Dio — who wrote long after she died — described it with a word translators have rendered as fair, tawny, and even flaming red, though Dio probably intended his audience to picture it as golden-blonde with perhaps a reddish tinge. Her name meant victory.

 

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